Women Workers And Technological Change I

Women Workers And Technological Change I
Pris
459,-
E-Bok
E-bøkene legges i din ARK-leseapp. Bøkene kan også lastes ned fra Din side.
×
Logg deg inn for å gjennomføre dette kjøpet med ett klikk!

Etter at kjøpet er gjennomført vil boken være tilgjengelig på «din side» og i ARK-appen
Format E-Bok
Kopisperre Teknisk DRM
Filformat PDF
Utgivelsesår 2005
Forlag Taylor and Francis
Språk Engelsk
ISBN 9781135747558
Se flere detaljer  

Andre formater / språk

E-Bok Nedlastbar Engelsk
×
Logg deg inn for å gjennomføre dette kjøpet med ett klikk!

Etter at kjøpet er gjennomført vil boken være tilgjengelig på «din side» og i ARK-appen

Om Women Workers And Technological Change I

From the traditional stereotyped viewpoint, femininity and technology clash. This negative association between women and technology is one of the features of the sex-typing of jobs. Men are seen as technically competent and creative; women are seen as incompetent, suited only to work with machines that have been made and maintained by men. Men identify themselves with technology, and technology is identified with masculinity. The relationship between technology, technological change and women's work is, however, very complex.; Through studies examining technological change and the sexual division of labour, this book traces the origins of the segregation between women's work and men's work and sheds light on the complicated relationship between work and technology. Drawing on research from a number of European countries England, Sweden, Denmark and the Netherlands, international contributors present detailed studies on women's work spanning two centuries. The chapters deal with a variety of work environments - office work, textiles and pottery, food production, civil service and cotton and wool industries.; This work rejects the idea that women were mainly employed as unskilled labour in the industrial revolutions, asserting that skill was required from the women, but that both the historical record about women's work and the social construction of the concept of "skill" have denied this.


Kundevurderinger

ARKs anbefalinger

Det finnes ingen vurderinger av dette produktet. Skriv anmeldelse

Anbefalt


Tips en venn